Caucus and convention information for 2016


Each even-numbered year, the Democratic Party holds caucuses and conventions to elect delegates and hear from candidates, as well as adopt resolutions and agree on a platform at the county and state levels.

All Washingtonians who identify as Democrats are encouraged to attend these events. There will be five events in this year’s caucus and convention cycle:

  1. the precinct caucuses on Saturday, March 26th, at 10 AM;
  2. the legislative district caucuses on Sunday, April 17th at 1 PM;
  3. the King County Democratic Convention at Hazen High on Sunday, May 1st, at 1 PM;
  4. the congressional district caucuses on Saturday, May 21st (10 AM anticipated start time);
  5. the Washington State Democratic Convention from June 17th – 19th (all day) in Tacoma.
    1. Opening ceremonies like the banquet dinner will take place on Friday, June 17th
    2. The Convention itself will take place on Saturday, June 18th, starting at 9 AM
    3. Selection of delegates to the Democratic National Convention will take place on Sunday, June 19th

These events will be followed by the Democratic National Convention from July 25th – 28th, 2016, in Philadelphia.

What were the results of the March 26th presidential precinct caucuses?

The Washington State Democratic Party has a page that shows the results of the March 26th presidential precinct caucuses.

What is a caucus? What happens at a caucus?

Very simply, a caucus is a meeting of Democratic voters and activists. It’s a chance to meet your Democratic neighbors and discuss who would be the best candidate to succeed President Obama as our country’s next leader. Participants elect delegates to the next level of caucuses for their presidential candidate of choice (e.g. Hillary or Bernie). Any Washingtonian who will be eighteen by November 8th, 2016, who considers themselves to be a Democrat, and is willing to publicly identify as a Democrat may participate in the caucuses.

I haven’t turned eighteen yet. Can I participate in the caucuses and conventions?

If you will turn eighteen by Election Day, November 8th, 2016, then yes, you may participate. Note that you can only vote at the upcoming congressional district caucuses and state convention if you were elected as a delegate or alternate to go to those events. You can run for delegate to the National Convention, but you must submit your declaration of candidacy by May 6th (to run at the congressional level) or June 10th (to run for a statewide at-large position). You may register to vote exactly as if you were already eighteen and King County Elections will simply hold your registration for activation on your birthday.

I am not a United States citizen. Can I participate in the caucuses and conventions?

You may attend as an observer/guest, but you may not vote unless you are a U.S. citizen and resident of Washington who is of age (or will be by November 8th).

King County Democrats remember George Zander

This morning, we lost former King County Democratic Chair George Zander, a pioneering advocate for LGBT rights. George led KCDCC in the early nineties; he resided in Palm Springs, California during the last years of his life. Tragically, he was the victim of a hate crime last month. The King County Democrats extend our deepest condolences to George’s husband Chris, George’s family, and all of George’s many friends. He will be missed.

Congratulations, Claudia!

In early returns, Democrat Claudia Balducci is decisively defeating Republican Jane Hague, becoming the first Democrat elected to the King County Council from the Eastside. This is a huge accomplishment. Congratulations, Claudia! We are very proud of you and look forward to seeing you take office as the 6th District’s new representative in a few weeks.

Claudia Balducci

Claudia Balducci speaks to the King County Democrats in August 2015 (Photo: Andrew Villeneuve)

King County Democrats endorse Scott Pinkham for school board, take positions on eight ballot measures

At this month’s executive board meeting in Renton, the King County Democrats met to consider taking endorsement action in several contests which will be decided by voters this November. This post summarizes the endorsement votes taken at the meeting. To pass, an endorsement motion must receive a two-thirds vote.

  • We began with Seattle City Council, District #8. We have already endorsed Jon Grant in this race. A motion to endorse Tim Burgess for the same position was made from the floor. This motion failed by a vote of twenty-four to eighteen.
  • We moved on to Seattle School Board, Director #1. By a vote of thirty-three to one, we endorsed Scott Pinkham.
  • We then considered an endorsement of Laura Gramer for Seattle School Board Director #2. We had previously endorsed Rick Burke for this position. A motion to endorse Laura failed by a vote of twenty-five to thirteen.
  • We then moved on to ballot measures. By a vote of forty-one to two, we took a position in favor of Paul Allen’s I-1401.
  • By a vote of forty-two to zero, we took a Maintained position on Advisory Votes 10, 11, 12, and 13, which appear on the statewide ballot.
  • By a vote of forty-one to one, we took a position supporting I-122 (Honest Elections Seattle).
  • By a vote of forty-three to zero, we took a position supporting King County Proposition 1 (Best Starts for Kids).
  • Finally, by a vote of twenty-five to ten, we took a position supporting Seattle Proposition #1 (Let’s Move Seattle).

These actions conclude our endorsement business for 2015. Ballots will be mailed for the November 2015 general election next month.